Book Accessibility

In prior posts, we mentioned how teacher instruction and parental involvement build great readers. In additions to that, kids need access to books. As a youngster, I remember waiting on Haddon Ave. for the Bookmobile to arrive. Standing on the cold, dark street with an armful of already-read books, I couldn’t wait to scoot inside the warm truck and find new stories to devour. The Bookmobile, a mini-library on wheels with its list of regular, scheduled stops is always a fun mini-outing and manageable alternative to visiting the mall.

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Later, as a middle school student, whenever I had questions about animals, places, well-known people, or a school assignment about presidents, my mother would tell me to look it up, even when she knew the answers. I grew up pre-Internet, so after finding the information in one of the books from our set of encyclopedias, I continued reading about a wide assortment of other subjects that began with the letter “P.”

Today, since many families own a computer or hand-held device, kids have access to books—free books. Websites such as www.magickeys.com , www.meegenius.com (nominal fee),  and

Click on the picture for an ebook list from Gizmo's Freeware

Click on the picture for an ebook list from Gizmo's Freeware

enable kids to dive into a book anytime they want.